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Voices of Diversity

An Online LGBT Story Archive

Voices of Diversity is a online multimedia archive of stories submitted by gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and allied students, faculty, staff, and alumni of the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

Intellectual and social growth is best fostered in a campus community composed of individuals with varying backgrounds, perspectives, interests, talents, and values. The personal story serves as a powerful tool in aiding the creation of a diverse campus environment by spreading ideas, highlighting differing viewpoints, and emphasizing unique personal experiences.

Add Your Story

  • What is it like being LGBT on campus?
  • What is it like coming out in college?
  • What is it like to have to stay in the closet?
  • What is it like being an ally to the LGBT community?

Your story is important! It reflects your own experiences and aspirations during your association with the University of Tennessee. It acts as a powerful message to other LGBT people by letting them know they are not alone on campus. Your story brings visibility and raises awareness of LGBT issues and concerns. Additionally, your story helps to develop a supportive leaning environment by becoming a positive role model to LGBT students, faculty, staff, alumni and allies.

Procedures

The story or stories you contribute to the archive can be written or typed text, audio, video, photographic essays, or a combination thereof. You must be eighteen years of age or older and sign an informed consent statement to participate. Collaborative group participation is encouraged, but each participant will need to submit the necessary forms and meet with the archivists.

If you would like to contribute a story, e-mail your name, phone number, and regularly available meeting times to a project archivist (Donna Braquet or Roger Weaver). All meetings will be confidential and will include only you and one or both project archivists.

Your first meeting will include:

  • An overview of Voices of Diversity
  • A discussion of requirements (should you choose to participate)
    • Must be eighteen years of age or older
    • Read and sign an informed consent statement
    • Complete a submission form
    • Stories can not threaten violence, contain copyrighted content, contain identifying information of others without their permission or be sexually explicit
  • An explanation of the Informed Consent Form
  • Clarification of any questions or concerns
  • A discussion of the options available for submitting your story
    • Submit a prepared story at the first meeting
    • Submit a prepared story at a later date
    • Be interviewed at the first meeting
    • Be interviewed at a later date

A subsequent meeting after you have submitted your story will include:

  • A review of your story
  • Your agreement to accept the story as is
  • Signature of deed of gift transferring your story to the archive
  • Should you not accept your story as is, additional changes can be made until you are satisfied

Examples of the forms discussed above are available in the Documents Library for your review. These forms will be explained in detail during your first meeting. Do not bring pre-signed forms to your meetings as it is necessary for you to sign all forms in the presence of an archivist. Participation in Voices of Diversity is completely voluntary.

Voices of Diversity Goals and Objectives

  1. Voices of Diversity serves as a way for students, faculty, staff, alumni and allies to share their experiences with others, be they stories of identity and community or stories of acceptance and discrimination.
  2. Voices of Diversity helps other LGBT individuals on campus realize that they are not alone.
  3. Voices of Diversity brings much needed visibility to LGBT issues and raises awareness among non-LGBT students, faculty, staff, and alumni through the simple, yet profound, medium of the personal story.
  4. Voices of Diversity plays a role in developing a supportive learning environment for LGBT students by giving ‘out’ faculty, students, and administrators an opportunity to serve as positive role models.
  5. Voices of Diversity serves as a living historical archive of LGBT experiences on the Knoxville campus. The stories will serve as an invaluable resource for future students and researchers.

Getting the word out to the university community is extremely important. The documents below are freely available to everyone. Please download them, reproduce them, and distribute them to any interested parties. Contact the archivists if you would like copies sent to you. The archivists are also available to meet with groups to discuss Voices of Diversity. Please feel free to contact them for additional information or to arrange for a presentation.

Contact Voices of Diversity

Project Archivists

Donna Braquet
Associate Professor & Librarian
E-mail: dbraquet@utk.edu
Phone: 865-974-0016

Roger Weaver
Institutional Repository & Digital Collections Librarian
E-mail: weaverjr@mst.edu
Phone: 573-341-4221

 

Interview with Jenny Moshak

Border Photo Name: Jenny Moshak
Status: Staff/Alumni
Department: Women’s Athletics
Time at UTK: 19 years
Age: 43
Gender identity: Female
Race/Ethnicity: Caucasian
Orientation: Lesbian
Type of Story: Interview
Date of Interview: 05/02/2008
Keywords/Tags Provided: Athletics, Basketball, Lady Vols, Lesbian

 

Listen to Jenny Moshak’s Interview>>

 

Interview with Dr. George H. Hoemann

Border Photo Name: George H. Hoemann
Status: Staff
Department/Major: Distance Education and Independent Study
Time at UTK: 18 years
Age: 56
Gender Identity: Male
Orientation: Gay
Race/Ethnicity: White
Type of Story: Interview
Date of Interview: 04/25/2008
Keywords/Tags Provided: Assistant Dean, Chair of Commission for LGBT People

 

Listen to Dr. Hoemann’s Interview>>

© Voices of Diversity
University of Tennessee Commission for LGBT People

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

 

 

Interview with Lynn Sacco

Border Photo Name: Lynn Sacco
Status: Faculty
Department: History
Time at UTK: 5 years
Age: 54
Gender identity: Female
Race/Ethnicity: Caucasian
Orientation: Lesbian
Type of Story: Interview
Date of Interview: 12/16/2008

Listen to Dr. Sacco’s Interview>>
Interview with Dr. Bharat Mehra
Assistant Professor of Information Sciences

 

A Prayer

Border Photo Name: Roger Weaver
Status: Staff
Department: Library
Time at UTK: 5 Years
Age: 49
Gender identity: Male
Race/Ethnicity: White
Orientation: Gay
Type of Story: Poetry
Date of Submission: 12/11/2008
Keywords/Tags Provided:

View PDF Version

A Prayer

O God,
Hear your suffering children cry.
Freedom! Freedom! Freedom!

O God,
Her your persecuted children plea.
Justice! Justice! Justice!

O God,
Hear your faithful children pray.
Forgive them! Forgive them! Forgive them!

Roger Weaver
November 1, 1993

© Voices of Diversity
University of Tennessee Commission for LGBT People

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

 

Basic Rights

Name: Anonymous
Status:
Department:
Time at UTK:
Age:
Gender identity: Female
Race/Ethnicity: Caucasian
Orientation: Lesbian
Type of Story: Poetry
Date of Submission: 12/08/2008
Keywords/Tags Provided:

View PDF Version

Basic Rights

Life
The right to live without fear;
physical harm shall not shed a tear.
Hate Crimes Legislation, including Sexual Orientation.

Liberty
The right to work and be productive citizens;
with benefits and no criticism.
Employee Non-Discrimination Act,
we are not going away, that’s a fact.

Pursuit of Happiness
No one on the earth lives in a high enough tower;
love is blessed by a higher power.
Civil marriage is a divine, secular and constitutional right;
we must never loose sight.

GLBT, people striving to be free.
All US citizens deserve basic rights;
it’s our country’s founding fight.

Anonymous

© Voices of Diversity
University of Tennessee Commission for LGBT People

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

 

Devils in the Dark

Border Photo Name: Roger Weaver
Status: Staff
Department: Library
Time at UTK: 5 Years
Age: 49
Gender identity: Male
Race/Ethnicity: White
Orientation: Gay
Type of Story: Poetry
Date of Submission: 12/11/2008
Keywords/Tags Provided:

View PDF Version

Devils in the Dark

In the darkness of the daylight
In the mansions of the poor
They gather in their singleness
To preach and to abhor

From their mouths come subtle hatred
Designed to divide you and confuse
Their deeds are acts of shamefulness
True honor they refuse

They claim themselves for Christendom
While their thoughts burn cold as fire
The old wisdom they have twisted
It is not to holiness they aspire

Their shadow faith they wish to spread
Great wealth and power their goal
What will they not accomplish and collect
When at last they command your soul

When looking for your devils
Don´t cast your glances at me
Look to those you follow
And tell me what you see

Roger Weaver
Summer, 1993
To Christian Fundamentalists

© Voices of Diversity
University of Tennessee Commission for LGBT People

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

 

Depression

Border Photo Name: Roger Weaver
Status: Staff
Department: Library
Time at UTK: 5 Years
Age: 49
Gender identity: Male
Race/Ethnicity: White
Orientation: Gay
Type of Story: Poetry
Date of Submission: 12/11/2008
Keywords/Tags Provided:

View PDF Version

Depression

I am an autumn leaf, adrift on the breath of a discontented god.
No control. No rest. No ending. No hope.

Roger Weaver
Summer, 1993

© Voices of Diversity
University of Tennessee Commission for LGBT People

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

 

 

Dreams

Name: Anonymous
Status:
Department:
Time at UTK:
Age:
Gender identity: Female
Race/Ethnicity: Caucasian
Orientation: Lesbian
Type of Story: Poetry
Date of Submission: 12/08/2008
Keywords/Tags Provided:

View PDF Version

Dreams

I dream during the day,
to take the pain away.

I dream about freedom in this country that treats me like a criminal,
of religions no longer cynical.

I dream at night,
that the politicians and the courts make it right.

I dream our neighbors will no longer judge in haste,
so my effort will not go to waste.

I dream to be understood,
to be heard and appreciated, we all should.

I dream of people who tell no lies,
who speak from the heart, which cries.

I dream that one day adults will see the truth,
no longer blinded by their youth.

I dream that no one will have to hide,
instead walk the streets with great pride.

I dream that one day I will no longer deny my love,
the true message sent from above.

Dream with me,
to make it reality.

Anonymous

© Voices of Diversity
University of Tennessee Commission for LGBT People

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

 

 

From a Gay Man

Border Photo Name: Roger Weaver
Status: Staff
Department: Library
Time at UTK: 5 Years
Age: 49
Gender identity: Male
Race/Ethnicity: White
Orientation: Gay
Type of Story: Poetry
Date of Submission: 12/11/2008
Keywords/Tags Provided:

View PDF Version

From a Gay Man

I am your son, your daughter,
Your aunt, your uncle,
Your brother, Your sister,
Your cousin, your neighbor.
I am your employee, your doctor,
Your lawyer, your teacher,
Your Friend.

I walk with you, talk with you,
Cry with you, laugh with you,
Worship with you, morn with you.
I defend you, play with you,
Dine with you, camp with you,
Travel with you, share with you,
Love you.

Yet I am slave to your prejudice.
My shackles are your ignorance,
My task master, your misguided faith.
I toil under your whip of terror and reprisal.
My back scarred by your hate and fear.
I cry out in pain, but you ignore me.
I am afraid.

Wy do you do this?
I have done nothing to you.
If you fear me, learn to know me.
If I offend you, then learn to know yourself.
If you faith rejects me then reexamine it.
Have the courage to learn,
Not fear.

I only want to be with you.
To dream as you dream, to hope as you hope,
To strive and achieve, to live as you live.
To smile with you, to joke with you,
To play with you children, to run with you,
To work with you, to die with you,
To care for you.

Allow me this dignity and yours will be returned.
I can give to you myself and together we can touch the future.
We can do so much, if only you will allow it.
You and I are together on the earth but a short time.
Souls together, struggling to live and fearing to die.
Each of us both wanting and lacking.
Each of us human.

Roger Weaver January 28, 1993

© Voices of Diversity
University of Tennessee Commission for LGBT People

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

 

 

The Garden

Border Photo Name: Roger Weaver
Status: Staff
Department: Library
Time at UTK: 5 Years
Age: 49
Gender identity: Male
Race/Ethnicity: White
Orientation: Gay
Type of Story: Poetry
Date of Submission: 12/11/2008
Keywords/Tags Provided:

View PDF Version

The Garden

I am this patchwork garden,
Planted with unending kindness and love,
Watered with tears of unneeded sorrow.
Growing in me are remembrances of too many shortened lives.

Walk my paths with reverence and awe,
I grow on sacred and hallowed ground,
Bought with innocent life,
Blessed by caring hands and unselfish deeds.

In me weeds of hate will not grow,
To thorny prejudice I give no resting place,
Clinging apathy I reject,
Greed I will allow to wither and die.

I am a growing mirror to the soul,
Here ridicule has no place,
All are welcome,
From me no one will be cast out.

Gaze upon me and know that my beauty
Comes at too great a price.
I honor the memory of the dead,
I feed the mouths of the suffering.

I would wish not to exist at all,
Yet I am here, and here I will stay,
Firmly rooted in ground once hardened by hate,
Now softening with my presence.

I am this patchwork garden,
Planted with unending kindness and love.
Water me with your tears,
And remember.

Roger Weaver
January 14, 1994
For the Living Quilt Garden on the Knoxville Worlds Fair site to honor and feed victims of HIV/AIDS.
This poem was read at the dedication of the garden in the Spring of 1994.

© Voices of Diversity
University of Tennessee Commission for LGBT People

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

 

 

The Garden

Border Photo Name: Roger Weaver
Status: Staff
Department: Library
Time at UTK: 5 Years
Age: 49
Gender identity: Male
Race/Ethnicity: White
Orientation: Gay
Type of Story: Poetry
Date of Submission: 12/11/2008
Keywords/Tags Provided:

View PDF Version

The Garden

I am this patchwork garden,
Planted with unending kindness and love,
Watered with tears of unneeded sorrow.
Growing in me are remembrances of too many shortened lives.

Walk my paths with reverence and awe,
I grow on sacred and hallowed ground,
Bought with innocent life,
Blessed by caring hands and unselfish deeds.

In me weeds of hate will not grow,
To thorny prejudice I give no resting place,
Clinging apathy I reject,
Greed I will allow to wither and die.

I am a growing mirror to the soul,
Here ridicule has no place,
All are welcome,
From me no one will be cast out.

Gaze upon me and know that my beauty
Comes at too great a price.
I honor the memory of the dead,
I feed the mouths of the suffering.

I would wish not to exist at all,
Yet I am here, and here I will stay,
Firmly rooted in ground once hardened by hate,
Now softening with my presence.

I am this patchwork garden,
Planted with unending kindness and love.
Water me with your tears,
And remember.

Roger Weaver
January 14, 1994
For the Living Quilt Garden on the Knoxville Worlds Fair site to honor and feed victims of HIV/AIDS.
This poem was read at the dedication of the garden in the Spring of 1994.

© Voices of Diversity
University of Tennessee Commission for LGBT People

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

 

 

Gay Thanksgiving

Border Photo Name: Roger Weaver
Status: Staff
Department: Library
Time at UTK: 5 Years
Age: 49
Gender identity: Male
Race/Ethnicity: White
Orientation: Gay
Type of Story: Poetry
Date of Submission: 12/11/2008
Keywords/Tags Provided:

View PDF Version

Gay Thanksgiving

We are gathered here this evening
Around this table of plenty.
Each of us bound together
With bonds of our own choosing.

Bonds of trust and companionship,
Bonds of respect and acceptance,
Bonds of laughter and care,
Bonds of love.

In their tightness is wanted security.
Each knot, comfort.
Each twist a memory.
Each turn, a kind act.

This is true friendship,
Our bonds are proof.
What better thing should we celebrate
On this Thanksgiving Day.

Roger Weaver
November 1, 1993
To friends who done with us on Thanksgiving

© Voices of Diversity
University of Tennessee Commission for LGBT People

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

 

Name: Anonymous
Status:
Department:
Time at UTK:
Age:
Gender identity: Female
Race/Ethnicity: Caucasian
Orientation: Lesbian
Type of Story: Poetry
Date of Submission: 12/08/2008
Keywords/Tags Provided:

View PDF Version

God’s Will

All God’s creatures great and small;
were created to rise up, not fall.

Showered daily by negative and cruel messages;
God did not intend discrimination within the written passages.

The Lord is testing my strength inside;
I must no longer be afraid or hide.

Following a doctrine controlled by power hungry lust;
guides people so filled with hatred and disgust.

Faith that good will prevail over evil;
and put a stop to this upheaval.

Do on to others, as you would have them do on to you.
Why is this commandment followed by so few?

The Holly Spirit looks down from above,
beaming on every type of love.

Each of us procreated the same;
need not experience hatred in Jesus’ name.

The only sacred sin,
is not embracing the beauty within.

Religions telling me I have gone astray;
that God never willed it to be this way.

Believing the truth will be told;
a spiritual place in this secular world we will hold.

My soul will ring Heaven’s bell;
even after being told I will burn in Hell.

Protected by an Angel’s hood;
there are no demons in the good.

God has blessed me in so many ways;
especially in being Gay.

Anonymous

© Voices of Diversity
University of Tennessee Commission for LGBT People

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

 

 

Joy

Border Photo Name: Roger Weaver
Status: Staff
Department: Library
Time at UTK: 5 Years
Age: 49
Gender identity: Male
Race/Ethnicity: White
Orientation: Gay
Type of Story: Poetry
Date of Submission: 12/11/2008
Keywords/Tags Provided:

View PDF Version

Joy

I am the song of a running brook in early spring.
New life. New color. New beginnings.

Roger Weaver
Summer, 1993

© Voices of Diversity
University of Tennessee Commission for LGBT People

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

 

 

Light a Candle for Me

Border Photo Name: Roger Weaver
Status: Staff
Department: Library
Time at UTK: 5 Years
Age: 49
Gender identity: Male
Race/Ethnicity: White
Orientation: Gay
Type of Story: Poetry
Date of Submission: 12/11/2008
Keywords/Tags Provided:

View PDF Version

Light a Candle for Me

Shhhhh, be calm, be still,
Listen to the silence.
Can you hear them? The uncounted thousands.
They are calling in still quit whispers,
Remember me, light a candle for me.

Listen to the absent voices.
Here the unwritten songs.
See the life dances not danced,
Look at paintings unfinished,
Touch sculptures unimagined,
Feel missed caresses.
Sniff woolen sweaters long unworn,
Taste kisses not so long forgotten.

Shhhhh, be calm, be still,
Listen to the silence.
Can you hear them? The uncounted thousands.
They are calling in still quit whispers,
Remember me, light a candle for me.

Roger Weaver
Early May, 1994
Written for and read at the Knoxville Aids Vigil May 21, 1995

© Voices of Diversity
University of Tennessee Commission for LGBT People

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

 

Nothing to Worry About

Border Photo Name: Roger Weaver
Status: Staff
Department: Library
Time at UTK: 5 Years
Age: 49
Gender identity: Male
Race/Ethnicity: White
Orientation: Gay
Type of Story: Poetry
Date of Submission: 12/11/2008
Keywords/Tags Provided:

View PDF Version

Nothing to Worry About

They beat a man today.

Pointing and chiding, laughing and cursing,
They took him from his life and threw him to the ground.
They called him faggot, called him queer,
Drew his blood, gave him pain.

They beat a man today.

Feeling high, feeling proud,
They cheered each blow, relished each kick.
Slapped each others’ back in hardy congratulations.
A goal achieved, a point well made,
A task accomplished, confidence restored.

They beat a man today.

Don’t worry, no need for concerns.
He’s not black, not Jewish, not even a woman.
He’s no loving mother’s son, no loyal friend, no caring brother.
Just a low life queer, a raging faggot, not a man at all.
No need for remorse, no great loss, nothing to worry about at all.

They beat a man today.

Roger Weaver
February 3, 1993
To those who suffer from violent persecution

© Voices of Diversity
University of Tennessee Commission for LGBT People

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

 

 

Parting

Border Photo Name: Roger Weaver
Status: Staff
Department: Library
Time at UTK: 5 Years
Age: 49
Gender identity: Male
Race/Ethnicity: White
Orientation: Gay
Type of Story: Poetry
Date of Submission: 12/11/2008
Keywords/Tags Provided:

View PDF Version

Parting

The door stands stout and imposing,
Shield from possibilities and uncertainties,
Protection from hateful remarks,
Guardian from irrational fear,
Barrier to spiteful ignorance,
Deflector of misguided faith.

Within, bliss.
Serenity in your loving embrace.
Your presence perpetual comfort,
Your body enticing,
Your conversation enlightening.
Happiness, endowed by your laughter.

Without, turmoil.
Possibilities for hate,
Uncertainties in contact,
Laughter with double meaning.
Violence and danger portend.
Each action examined for effect.

My hand reaches for the knob,
Metallic coolness an omen.
I turn the knob, the shield breaks,
Doubt and anxiety ensue.
Without becomes reality,
A day begins.

Roger Weaver
March 10, 1993
To George for your birthday

© Voices of Diversity
University of Tennessee Commission for LGBT People

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

 

 

Purpose

Name: Anonymous
Status:
Department:
Time at UTK:
Age:
Gender identity: Female
Race/Ethnicity: Caucasian
Orientation: Lesbian
Type of Story: Poetry
Date of Submission: 12/08/2008
Keywords/Tags Provided:

View PDF Version

Purpose

I have a purpose, a purpose in life.
To make a difference in stopping the world’s strife.

A plan has been set for me;
this I can see.

My vision is not always clear.
I realize I must relinquish control and let my God steer.

My higher power will guide;
I will be patient and take things in stride.

The spirit surrounds me, my troubles relieved;
all I need to do is believe.

Learning from the past;
never dwelling or allowing it to last.

Living in the present;
reevaluating goals in order to make dent.

Embracing the future,
to impact social change that benefit cultures.

I am on this earth to do well;
encouraging people to understand is my sell.

My pen is my word;
my voice will be heard.

My will is the driving force,
that maintains my destined course.

I have a purpose, a purpose in life.
I will make a difference in stopping the world’s strife.

Anonymous

© Voices of Diversity
University of Tennessee Commission for LGBT People

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

 

 

To Rachel

Border Photo Name: Roger Weaver
Status: Staff
Department: Library
Time at UTK: 5 Years
Age: 49
Gender identity: Male
Race/Ethnicity: White
Orientation: Gay
Type of Story: Poetry
Date of Submission: 12/11/2008
Keywords/Tags Provided:

View PDF Version

To Rachel

While driving from work today, I saw two butterflies
Dancing a waltz of life across a clouding sky.
Turning and bobbing in intricate circling patterns, they danced.
Their yellow fluttering wings reflecting a broken and graying light
As they struggled to hold form and course
Against the gusts and eddies of an uncaring wind.

As I watched this tiny ballet of life playing before me
My thoughts turned to you.
What to say to you my new found friend
As the wind threatens and the sky clouds.
Comfort and encouragement I can offer, advice and insight I can give.
But perhaps all I need say is simply, Butterfly dance on.

Roger Weaver
June 18, 1993
To Rachel on learning she was diagnosed with a de-habilitating illness

© Voices of Diversity
University of Tennessee Commission for LGBT People

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

 

 

Why

Name: Anonymous
Status:
Department:
Time at UTK:
Age:
Gender identity: Female
Race/Ethnicity: Caucasian
Orientation: Lesbian
Type of Story: Poetry
Date of Submission: 12/08/2008
Keywords/Tags Provided:

View PDF Version

Why
Why discriminate against our fellow humankind;
when we only need to keep an open mind.

Why others do we hate;
when we should look at our own fate.

Why do people find life not worth living;
could it be that people are unforgiving?

Why do people go without food;
when crops are plentiful, just not used.

Why are some without a roof over head;
when there are so many empty beds.

Why are there tyrannies and atrocities;
when everyone deserves to be free.

Why do we judge;
aren’t we taught not to hold a grudge?

Why do people turn away those in need;
when we should reach out, extend a helping hand, perform a good deed.

Why do we kill;
when we should be expressing goodwill.

Why are there wars;
when we could talk across the shores.

Why do we separate;
when unity we could create.

Why do we deny rights;
aren’t they every one’s fight?

Why do we pigeon hole into classes;
when we came to the promised land as the masses.

Why do people just watch and stand by;
when at some time we have all cried.

No longer should we ask why;
it’s time to try.

Anonymous

© Voices of Diversity
University of Tennessee Commission for LGBT People

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.

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